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Cam Belt Breakages On 2.2 Hdi


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#1 Randombloke

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Posted 03 October 2007 - 06:08 PM

My local Citroen repairer has had 3 2.2 HDi engines in recently with belt breakages close to but below the 100k where they should be changed. There was also damage to cams and chain done in the failure.

In the light of this I will get mine done at 87.5 k not 100k, as I will be keeping the car in the long term, barring any major problem.

Something to consider if you have a 2.2 HDi powered car.........
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#2 2004hm

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Posted 16 November 2007 - 04:41 PM

My local Citroen repairer has had 3 2.2 HDi engines in recently with belt breakages close to but below the 100k where they should be changed. There was also damage to cams and chain done in the failure.

In the light of this I will get mine done at 87.5 k not 100k, as I will be keeping the car in the long term, barring any major problem.

Something to consider if you have a 2.2 HDi powered car.........

I agree I am going to do my C5 at 80k. I think 100k is rather optimistic some Alfas only do about 40k now. Regards, 2004hm.
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#3 myglaren

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Posted 16 November 2007 - 11:08 PM

If it uses a cambelt, what is it doing with a chain in there?
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#4 Randombloke

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Posted 17 November 2007 - 12:19 AM

If it uses a cambelt, what is it doing with a chain in there?


The cam belt connects the crankshaft to the rearmost of the twin overhead cams. A short chain connects one of the cams to the other.

When the belt fails there is usually damage to the chain as well. Saw a C8 with this problem, very costly.

Belt was changed last week at 85k.

Wheels were rebalanced and the 65-70 slight wobble is now gone.
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#5 myglaren

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Posted 17 November 2007 - 12:23 PM

The cam belt connects the crankshaft to the rearmost of the twin overhead cams. A short chain connects one of the cams to the other.
Wheels were rebalanced and the 65-70 slight wobble is now gone.


Right, thanks for that. I hadn't realised it was a DOHC (never even thought about it to be honest, even though my previous car was - an Accord - didn't find out about that for a year after buying the car and needing a new exhaust for it)

Speaking of exhausts, I had the car MOT'd a few weeks back and part of the exhaust was earmarked for attention. I have cleverly bought a new back box using the info supplied by the tester but then overcame the inertia and actually looked underneath the car yesterday to discover that it isn't the back box at fauly but the pipe between the box and the cat, where it joins the back box.

Can I fix this without replacing the cat? The suppliers seem pretty sketchy about this but tell me there are two different cats listed for my car ( I gave them the reg and vin numbers and they traced it from that)
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#6 pootle

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Posted 27 January 2008 - 03:48 PM

Me 2, 2nd failure (2nd engine come to that)

1st engine died at 56,000 miles, cam belt failed, just 2 weeks before end of 3 year warranty.
After a couple of ums and ahs, citroen replaced the engine for free.

Now at 127,000 miles it has happened again - with 71,000 miles on the engine.

Dealer maintened throughout this period.

Just waiting to hear how bad the news is.

I'm going to buy another car anyway - not a citroen this time.....
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#7 DaveHerns

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Posted 27 January 2008 - 04:29 PM

Keep us posted on what Citroen say
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#8 rickardo

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Posted 27 January 2008 - 07:03 PM

Right, thanks for that. I hadn't realised it was a DOHC (never even thought about it to be honest, even though my previous car was - an Accord - didn't find out about that for a year after buying the car and needing a new exhaust for it)

Speaking of exhausts, I had the car MOT'd a few weeks back and part of the exhaust was earmarked for attention. I have cleverly bought a new back box using the info supplied by the tester but then overcame the inertia and actually looked underneath the car yesterday to discover that it isn't the back box at fauly but the pipe between the box and the cat, where it joins the back box.

Can I fix this without replacing the cat? The suppliers seem pretty sketchy about this but tell me there are two different cats listed for my car ( I gave them the reg and vin numbers and they traced it from that)

you can get repair pipes from the cat back am sure its listed in a bosal exhaust book.
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#9 myglaren

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Posted 27 January 2008 - 09:10 PM

you can get repair pipes from the cat back am sure its listed in a bosal exhaust book.


Thanks - got one (weeks ago now) it is still floating around waiting for someone to do something with it. Good job it isn't urgent (the MOT tester slapped some Gun-Gum on it)
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#10 Randombloke

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Posted 27 January 2008 - 09:32 PM

Now at 127,000 miles it has happened again - with 71,000 miles on the engine.

Dealer maintained throughout this period.

Just waiting to hear how bad the news is.

I'm going to buy another car anyway - not a citroen this time.....


I'm going to guess about 1,500 for a repair to the top end.

Remember there are very similar engines in Peugeot and now Ford. And of course, it could be down to the way the belt was tensioned.....
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#11 myglaren

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Posted 27 January 2008 - 09:56 PM

I was told years ago that Ford bought their diesel engines from Peugeot as they were better than the ones Ford had developed and cheaper than them building their own.
Probably an urban legend but it would not surprise me to learn it was so. Volvo have been bunging Peugeot V6s in their cars for long enough.
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#12 Randombloke

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Posted 28 January 2008 - 07:01 PM

Probably an urban legend but it would not surprise me to learn it was so. Volvo have been bunging Peugeot V6s in their cars for long enough.


For cost reasons Peugeot - Renault - Volvo jointly developed a V6. It was 2.7 litres for reasons of tax in France. It was first seen in the 604 and Renault 30 and then in the De Lorean. It was known as the PRV V6, not surprisingly.

It may have grown to 3.0 since then. This design has probably been superceded by something with DOHC.
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#13 Guest_Scoobyman_*

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Posted 20 May 2008 - 06:03 PM

For cost reasons Peugeot - Renault - Volvo jointly developed a V6. It was 2.7 litres for reasons of tax in France. It was first seen in the 604 and Renault 30 and then in the De Lorean. It was known as the PRV V6, not surprisingly.

It may have grown to 3.0 since then. This design has probably been superceded by something with DOHC.


Had our C8 cambelt go at 85k this weekend. Citroen say 100k is only a "recommended" mileage for replacement! Is there anyone out there who has got Citroen to chip in towards repair bill? Dealer has quoted 5k for recon engine (fitted). Local private Peugeot/Citroen garage will do repair for 1700 but still very annoyed as the service schedule says 100k for replacement! Car is 4 year old and has full service history.

Any help would be appreciated.

Mac

#14 Johndouglas

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Posted 20 May 2008 - 06:46 PM

I was told years ago that Ford bought their diesel engines from Peugeot as they were better than the ones Ford had developed and cheaper than them building their own.


I bought a new diesel Ford Sierra in 1982 and that was fitted with a Peugeot 2.3 engine. At the time, Ford only had the Transit diesel. Their first attempt at car-sized diesels were used in the Escort and Fiesta which was a noisy, thirsty lump.
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#15 Ronin

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Posted 20 May 2008 - 09:20 PM

I agree I am going to do my C5 at 80k. I think 100k is rather optimistic some Alfas only do about 40k now. Regards, 2004hm.


I have an Alfa Romeo 156 2.5 v6 as my second car. A lot of owners take the cambelts to 40,000 and beyond even though it should really be changed every 36,000, not becuase of actual wear on the belt but because a guide roller can go faulty causing absoleute disaster as most of the 24 valves impact.
I've been lucky and do them both at every 30,000 myself now. She's done 68,000 now and no complaints. For the sake of 3 hours and 80, I think its well worth it.

The C5 1.8 16v was done 18,000 mile ago at 90,000 but I'm considering DIY on that too when it reaches 140,000. As long as there is a Haynes manual on the horizon, i'll give it a go.
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