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Lds Fluid Lost Quickly. C5 2008


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9 replies to this topic

#1 jaysams80

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Posted 03 May 2018 - 07:32 PM

So, parked up on the drive today, went out 20 minutes later to a puddle of oil and a steady stream of LDS coming from the rear.
Any common issues with leaks back there? It's coated the fuel tank with oil so I'm guessing it's the front to rear high pressure hose routed over the fuel tank.
How much of a job to change it?
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#2 paul.h

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Posted 04 May 2018 - 12:56 PM

It must be a big job since in the Citroen service box it gives 6 hours for the time to replace the rear intermediate return pipe. It does not give a procedure though.



#3 jaysams80

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Posted 04 May 2018 - 07:58 PM

Yes, since found out. Very big job. Intermediate exhaust cut out. Remove wheel and arch filler side. Remove additive tank. Remove fuel tank. Bend the new goddamn hose into place.
Madness.
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#4 paul.h

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Posted 04 May 2018 - 09:11 PM

I wonder if it is possible to get a longer pipe and route it a different way so all the things do not need removing. Maybe a Citroen specialist would help.



#5 jaysams80

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Posted 05 May 2018 - 09:33 AM

I have asked that question but they tell me it has to go back that way, hmmm. Surely if it's safely secured and not hindering any suspension components it would be okay.
Until then I am having an industrial liquid metal coating designed for burst high pressure pipes applied around the pipe.
If it works I'll post details of the product as it could save people a pretty penny. I'm not sure what pressure the LDS fluid is at but this stuff can withstand 5000 psi if applied properly. Wish me luck.
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#6 jaysams80

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Posted 09 May 2018 - 09:55 PM

UPDATE
The coating didn't work as there wasn't a good enough key for it to adhere.
Instead I have spliced a section of the pipe just away from the hole and the other side of the fuel tank.
The job can be done without cutting the exhaust and removing the fuel tank.
By removing the 3 bolts holding the fuel tank up and the single bolts holding the filler cap in place you can use a jack to lower the one side of the tank. Be careful not to lower too much and it puts stress on various pipes. The pipe was replaced using straight unions for brake pipes.
The car has now been pressurised and all looks well. Jobs a good 'un......so far.
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#7 paul.h

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Posted 10 May 2018 - 11:11 AM

This is good news. Where did you get the pipe/fittings from and did you have to put any flares on the pipe like you do on brake pipes ? Was there any obvious cause of the pipe leaking.



#8 jaysams80

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Posted 10 May 2018 - 04:27 PM

The pipe was standard 3/16 brake pipe Paul, cupro/nickel from any motor factors. The unions the same. The ends needed to be mushroomed for the unions I'd bought. The old steel pipe was a bit harder than the cupro/nickel to mushroom but still not difficult. The cause of the leak was corrosion where a bracket that should have held the pipe wasn't seated properly. Between that and the moisture it's sign through.
Unfortunately looking at my log book the car was used for its first 7 years at s coastal town, think the salt water has added to the corrosion. The tow bar is in a bad state too.
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#9 paul.h

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Posted 10 May 2018 - 11:18 PM

All the towbars I've bought have been supplied in primer but then needed painting before putting on the car. Probably whoever put the one on your car did not bother painting it. I have always used black smoothrite which seems to last long enough.



#10 jaysams80

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Posted 11 May 2018 - 05:41 AM

It was a factory fitted bar with twin electrics so I'm assuming it would have been colour finished. There is generally a lot of corrosion to pipes etc. Maybe time to get rid before something else goes?
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